Archive for September 2016

FrankenFourth: Age of Worms, Episode 502


Cast
  • Humal (level 7 wrathful cambion wizard)
  • Corzale (level 7 dwarf war cleric)
  • Sumia (level 7 elf rogue/ranger)
  • Kuhnja'bi (level 7 human w/ devil-in-the-details fighter)
  • Cenric (level 7 human fighter)

Summary
Eligos paid the party a visit while they were recuperating at the temple, providing them with some information about Kyuss and his minions (such as the unfortunate fact that the worm-zombies were apparently the least of their concerns). Humal chimed in when he mentioned the Apostolic Scrolls; Loris Raknian, the current manager of Dovin's arena, had purchased a set from the thulid that he had also paid to assassinate them.

Eligos warned the party that Raknian was wealthy and politically well-connected, so trying to confront him directly would be fruitless. Fortunately the champion's games were due to start in less than a week, and Eligos knew a manager that was still looking for a gladiator team. Posing as a team would make it easier for them to get inside the arena and try to figure out what exactly Raknian was up to. Another option was attempting to sneak in, but after Sumia expressed a strong interest in that plan the party opted to just register and participate in the games.

The manager, Ekaym, arrived that evening. He explained to the party some of the arena rules and rewards, the latter of which were considerable assuming the party came out victorious on at least most of the fights, but since Ekaym was fronting their entrance and maintenance fees he would receive half of any earnings aside from the Champion's Belt. The party agreed to this, and after signing the registration papers and allowing Humal to make a copy for them to go over in more detail later, Ekaym instructed them to meet him at the arena in five days to avoid disqualification.

While they waited Sumia trained under Humal: despite having little experience with divination magic, she quickly picked up the ability to see in complete darkness, though it demanded most of her meager arcane reserves to sustain the effect. The restored pseudodragon was delivered to Humal. Its name was Hysvearulharthurir, and after giving thanks, some compliments, and a few insults Humal decided to keep it around as his familiar.

Five mercifully uneventful days later they arrived at the arena, along with nearly two-dozen varied bands of other participants, including elves, dwarves, and even a small group of gnolls led by a human. Raknian arrived after each team had been seated at one of numerous tables heaped with a variety of food and drink; he didn't seem to recognize anyone in the party, and after delivering a short speech everyone began eating and conversing among themselves.

Some were obviously trying to learn more about the abilities and weaknesses of other teams, others placed bets, but numerous wardens and pouncers stationed about deterred any brawls, even from the more inebriated groups. When the banquet was concluded, the wardens escorted the teams to an elevator near the western side of the arena floor. There they were gradually lowered into the bowels of the arena to await the following day.

Design Notes
The players almost opted to just kick or sneak through Raknian's front door. I almost wish they had even though it probably wouldn't have worked out for them. I chose to have Raknian just not recognize them, because if he did then there's really nothing stopping him from making up a bunch of shit, calling in some favors, and having the characters disqualified, arrested, and/or assassinated.

Sumia multiclassed into wizard, picking up the Detect Magic and Darkvision talents (Detect Magic was a freebie because who wants to level up and just get that). Darkvision lets you see in complete darkness, which is what usually foiled Sumia's sneaking attempts in the past. It works out to 60 feet and requires most of her Mana reserves to sustain, but hey she no longer needs torches.

The only drawback is that she gets slightly reduced Wounds (you get Wounds and Vitality, and will have to wait a bit longer to get another attack and damage bonus (rogues and rangers get it sooner than wizards).

Humal picked up Familiar, binding himself with Hysvearulharthurir. Familiars currently grant you bonus Mana, which you can draw upon so long as they are touching you. They can also use it themselves to fuel whatever wizard talents you possess. So far it's a wizard-only talent (though I could also see it working for something like a witch).

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

A Sundered World: Player Fragments, the first supplement for A Sundered World, is finally out!

If you're looking for a class that lets you play almost any were-thing you want (plus a bunch of related extra content), then check out The Therianthrope. There's also The Dragon, a class that lets you play almost any dragon-ish thing you could think of.

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

A Sundered World: Actual Play Summary

This was originally posted in the private A Sundered World G+ group. I reshared it with the public group (with permission) because you can't reshare from a private group or change a group's privacy later. I figured I'd also post it here, because it sounds really cool and the guy might make the city into its own ASW book thing:

Just ran my first Sundered World campaign. It included a god in the form of a living library; a warlock whose patron is a shattered god personified as a pair of praying hands with a glowing eye in the center. The cambion became this forgotten god's patron after his legion's ship was destroyed by dark elf marauders.

The t'pual became a nomad after his divine library was destroyed by thulids aspiring to drain its knowledge.

Both characters are tasked with bringing their gods back to life. The nomad carries a shard of the living library, which he must cultivate once again to resurrect his god. The cambion looks for fragments of his patron as well.

The PCs determined that the characters met in a way station and decided to travel together in a sky ship bequeathed to them by the warlock's patron. They game started with the PCs landing upon the belly of massive, dead spider god impaled by a spear with a city carven up its length. They visited this unknown fragment at the behest of the cambion's patron. They were tasked with locating a curio shop made of tongues nestled somewhere within Mort Tanis, to either purchase or steal a vial containing the ash of a cleric who once worshipped the warlock's patron.

Before they reached Mort Tanis, their ship was stolen by dark elf drones; they fought a trio of slavering hounds; they revealed a nefarious plot to murder a Winter Court elf residing within the spear city of Mort Tanis.

Once they visited the city, they conversed with bipedal arachnids and were able to determine that the curio shop was located on the Avenue of Moths. When they reached the location, they stopped and chatted with an elf selling cloud spiders, as well its hallucinogenic venom. The cambion purchased some of the venom and asked the elf to translate a note that they discovered on one of the dark elf thieves.

The letter described a plot murder a winter elf emissary residing somewhere within Mort Tanis. That is where we left off. I love the setting. I love the rules, too. My players definitely love the setting, but they're struggling to wrap their heads around Dungeon World. Thankfully, they're quite accommodating, and are eager to forge ahead.

So I wanna hear more, he at least wants me to illustrate Mort Tanis, and I hope he fleshes the island out and publishes it.

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

A Sundered World: Player Fragments, the first supplement for A Sundered World, is finally out!

If you're looking for a class that lets you play almost any were-thing you want (plus a bunch of related extra content), then check out The Therianthrope. There's also The Dragon, a class that lets you play almost any dragon-ish thing you could think of.

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).
September 24, 2016
Posted by David Guyll

Dungeon World: The Dragon

The Dragon is now on sale! It has been added to our All of the Playbooks and Monster Mash bundles over on DriveThruRPG.

Take to the skies (with or without wings), annihilate your enemies from a distance with a devastating breath weapon, or close in to tear them apart with fang and claw, shrugging off their pathetic blows with your armored hide.

You start out by choosing from three types of dragons (and there are ten more in the back), which determines what your breath weapon does and grants another ability. As you level up you can become bigger, tougher, and more dangerous in a variety of ways: sharper claws and teeth, a more potent breath weapon, even your blood can become hazardous to your enemies (but beneficial for your allies).

You can also learn how to smell out treasure (and those that might futilely try and keep it out of your talons), transform into a human, affect the land around your lair, become resistant to magic (and even reflect it back on the spellcaster), gain fanatically loyal followers, and strike fear in those would would stand before you with your mere presence.

This product contains three files.

The first is a letter-sized character sheet that uses our new character sheet layout (so we could fit the twenty-nine advanced moves on the back).

The other two are digest-sized PDFs, one in color, the other in black and white to make it easier to print at home. They both contain:
  • The dragon class.
  • Armor made from dragon parts, and armor made for dragon parts.
  • Some extra dungeon gear.
  • Chromatic dragon types, so if you wanna play D&D dragon you can.
  • Other dragon types, like the dragon turtle, feathered serpent, and wyvern.
  • The dracolich compendium class.
  • A set of moves to represent ryu dragon magic (but could be easily reskinned for other dragons).
  • A Director's Cut with questions to ask yourself when rolling up a dragon, explanations/clarifications for some of the moves, and some extra monsters.

You can see a preview of it over on DriveThruRPG.

Note: If you purchase using the PayPal Buy Now button, we will also send you a complimentary copy through DriveThruRPG. Please allow up to 24 hours for delivery, though it usually ends up being at most eight (depends on if you buy it after we've gone to bed).

$2.50

$2.75


$2.75


$2.75


Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

A Sundered World: Player Fragments, the first supplement for A Sundered World, is finally out!

If you're looking for a class that lets you play almost any were-thing you want (plus a bunch of related extra content), then check out The Therianthrope!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

FrankenFourth: Giant Concept

A few days ago my daughter fished out some giant minis from one of our bins (mostly some fire and frost giants, along with various titans), and after we built a dungeon mostly scaled for them I was surprised to find that I hadn't yet statted any sort of giant for FrankenFourth.

As with most things I started by doing some research, because in the course of writing a bajillion Dungeon World classes, A Sundered World, and other various things I've realized that when it comes to monsters the mythological source has usually been more interesting than the Dungeons & Dragons iteration (and, by association, Dungeon World).

Here's some of what I was able to dig up:

In Greek mythology giants were really strong, but not necessarily really big (good for if I wanna include a super-strong human-ish race option/talent tree), and some representations depicted giants as having snakes for legs. Weird, but different. They also fought against the Olympian gods, so that's something to keep in mind when thinking about giant flavor/background stuff.

The cyclopes were one-eyed giants that were imprisoned and released from Tartarus a few times, and forged magical weapons for some of the Olympian gods. I recall 4th Edition Dungeons & Dragons really playing up this aspect (as well as giving them magic eyes), having them create weapons for the fomorians, but I think it's enough to just say that some cyclopes would be responsible for various magic items (and could even teach characters how to make some, or at least make magic items in exchange for something).

Norse mythology mentions a variety of giants, such as clay, fire, frost, sea, and wind (I'm guessing this is what Dungeons & Dragons used as inspiration for its classic giant roster). Some looked monstrous, with fangs and claws, sometimes even multiple heads or animal shapes (such as Hr├Žsvelgr, who looks like an eagle). Others were described as quite beautiful, and as with Greek giants some were also human-sized and battled against the gods.

Bulgarian giants, known as ispolin, were described as being about 10 feet tall and, depending on the legend, having one huge head, three heads with a single eye each, or one leg. They were said to only eat raw meat, fought dragons, and fear blackberry bushes: they would I guess fall into them, get stuck, and die, and so would offer sacrifices to appease them. Doesn't matter, because in the end they were destroyed by God, who deemed them unsuited for life on Earth.

In European folklore, it was not only believed that giants built the remains of previous civilizations, but sometimes natural features were attributed to their actions. For example the Giant's Causeway, located on the northeast coast of northern Ireland, is an area of nearly 40,000 interlocking basalt columns said to have been built by a giant (but were really formed 50-60 million years ago due to volcanic activity). Even so, looks neat and could easily be dropped into your campaign as something built by a giant:



Interesting stuff, but from what I found not much different from Dungeons & Dragons, which mostly treats them as Large or Huge humanoids. So, I guess mechanically FrankenFourth giants will be similar, though I'll still put in customization sidebars for giving your giants claw and bite attacks, extra heads, and so on. I couldn't find much in the way of magical/special abilities, which is what I was hoping for because I'm not a fan of the whole nonsense pseudo-Vancian spellcasting thing that some D&D giants have.

This is something I'll change so that, for example, instead of a storm giant being able to cast levitate 2-3 times per day (yawn), they could cause a storm to build up whenever they want (maybe treating it as a ritual effect that takes 10 minutes or so). Channeling a lightning bolt could normally be a recharging thing (or inflict fatigue damage per wizard/sorcerer spellcasting), but in stormy weather they would be able to use it constantly and even fly about.

For now though I'm going to focus on statting out fire giants, since that's what I have the most of (and also a lava-cavern Dwarven Forge set that I've barely used). I can't recall any encounter-building guidelines for 2nd Edition, but checking Editions 3-through-5 I see that your average fire giant is intended to be thrown at the party at roughly the halfway mark of their adventuring career.

FrankenFourth has actually flat math, but for the sake of backwards compatibility pegging them at 10th-level sounds fine by me, and using our monster-making guidelines (and D&D ability score mods) we end up with the following stat block:

FIRE GIANT
Level 10 Large Humanoid (Giant)
XP 80

ABILITY SCORES
STR +7 DEX -1 WIS +2
CON +6 INT 0 CHA +1

SKILLS
Athletics +10, Intimidate +6, Perception +6

DEFENSE
Initiative -1
Speed 15 feet/40 feet
Fort 17 Ref 10 Will 12
Armor 4 (plate)
Immunities fire
Wounds 91 Vitality 31 Total 122

OFFENSE
Multiattack 2 The fire giant can make two longsword attacks per round.
Longsword +10 to hit; 2d8+2d6+7 damage (2 armor piercing).

Fire giants don't have literally fiery beards and hair. Being native to a realm of fire and ash (something at least similar to Muspelheim), they are immune to its effects (smoke doesn't blind them, and they do not choke on it). They tend to be skilled smiths, and would definitely be on a list of creatures to seek out for characters that want to master the weaponsmithing and armorer craft skills. Probably also know rare/unknown craft techniques for even magical items (like flaming swords).

Customization options would include burning blood (targets that deal Wound damage need to make a check to avoid taking fire damage), molten claws, fire/lava/smoke breath (really bad if the giant also has multiple heads), command flames, transforming into fire or lava, splitting the ground open with burning fissures, and conjuring creatures made of fire/lava. Depends on how weird and/or magical you want the giant to be.

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

A Sundered World: Player Fragments, the first supplement for A Sundered World, is finally out!

If you're looking for a class that lets you play almost any were-thing you want (plus a bunch of related extra content), then check out The Therianthrope!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

Dungeon World: The Therianthrope

The Therianthrope is now on sale! It has been added to our All of the Playbooks and Monster Mash bundles.

This isn't a werewolf or were-class that lets you choose from a handful of common animals: it has been specifically designed with flexibility in mind. You start out by choosing a number of features from a list (such as increased damage, size, armor, and various other benefits), and as you level up you can choose to become better at changing your shape (and gain more features), stronger, tougher, sneaking around and ambushing creatures, blending in with a crowd, and so on.

This flexibility extends beyond what you can turn into and how your character can grow: there are three general backgrounds to determine how you acquired your powers. You can be cursed, inherit it, or learn it through magic. You even get to choose a move from another class, so you can be, for example, a cleric cursed by her god, a fighter that was afflicted while hunting a werewolf down, or a wizard or witch that discovered the process.

This product contains three files.

The first is a letter-sized character sheet that uses our new character sheet layout (so we could fit the twenty-six advanced moves).

The other two are digest-sized PDFs, one in color, the other in black and white to make it easier to print at home. They both contain:
  • The therianthrope class.
  • Silvered weapons, new types of armor, and animal armor.
  • The cursed therianthrope compendium class.
  • Nine moves for if you want to better evoke a kitsune.
  • A Director's Cut with questions to ask yourself when rolling up a therianthrope, explanations/clarifications for some of the moves, advice on permitting more multiclassing, nine extra/variant moves that we couldn't fit on the sheet (including one for if your animal form is your normal shape), and rules for companion characters.

You can see a preview of it over on DriveThruRPG.

Note: If you purchase using the PayPal Buy Now button, we will also send you a complimentary copy through DriveThruRPG. Please allow up to 24 hours for delivery, though it usually ends up being at most eight (depends on if you buy it after we've gone to bed).

$2.50

$2.75


$2.75


$2.75


Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

A Sundered World: Player Fragments, the first supplement for A Sundered World, is finally out!

The Paladin is technically the sixth "core" class we've provided an alternative for. If you interested in an alternate class that isn't merely a half-assed reskin, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

Dungeon World: Modding Monsters

Over on my vrock post, Svafa asked if I'd ever considered making a sort of monster manual for Dungeon World, because he enjoys the monsters I cook up and/or the modifications I make to existing monsters. Up to that point I hadn't, but I am now.

Before I talk about some changes I'll be making to the "core" statblock, I want to request that if you have any gripes about monsters as presented in Dungeon World (and I suppose gripes in general), let me know! I've had people bring up a lack of art and story seeds/adventure hooks, and have been referred to Numenera and 13th Age for examples of what they want.

You can leave a comment here, email me, or hit me up on whatever social media thing you prefer.

Now, with that out of the way: changes. The two big deviations from the book (so far) are instinct and moves.

Instinct is for the most part garbage. I mean, check out the lich: it's "instinct" is to "un-live", whatever the fuck that means. It might as well say "do lich things". The dwarf's instinct is "to defend", which is a bit more defined than the lich but also nonsense: is that all every dwarf cares about? What about, for starters, looking for gold/gems, gaining honor, keeping the clan safe, gaining glory for his clan, crafting something that everyone will remember him by, and/or reclaiming an ancestral stronghold that was taken by a dragon?

Also, how does the dwarf's instinct cause problems for others?

I suppose I could just change the instinct to something actually relevant at a given point in time, which I'm sure would anger certain members of the Dungeon World community, but why bother? It's easier to just ignore instinct and let GMs do whatever with the monster. So, unless someone can make a case for it, it's going away.

Moves aren't as useless, but can still limit what you'd think monsters can do. Checking the ogre, its moves are destroy something, fly into a rage, and take something by force. When I think about an ogre fighting, I picture it just barreling through a mob of people, swatting a bunch of people aside, maybe picking someone up and throwing them, kicking someone out of its way, or even just smashing someone underfoot (or underclub).

Problem is none of the stuff I mentioned are moves.

I suppose I could just go with the "fiction", and let an ogre do all of those things I said because it makes sense, but then as with instinct why bother having a list of moves in the first place? So, rather than specify 1-4 moves that you might use, ignore, modify, and/or swap out, I'm just going to write a moves section that gives you an idea as to what a monster might do, and you the GM can use the examples, build on them, or just do whatever.

I'm also considering scrapping special qualities, because I feel like there's too much overlap with tags. Like, instead of saying "made of fire", I can just give it the blazing tag, and instead of saying "incoporeal", I can just give it the incorporeal tag. Things like "made of stone" or "inch-thick metal hide" can be highlighted in the description or moves section, and stuff like "shell" don't need to be there at all.

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

A Sundered World: Player Fragments, the first supplement for A Sundered World, is finally out!

The Paladin is technically the sixth "core" class we've provided an alternative for. If you interested in an alternate class that isn't merely a half-assed reskin, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

4Ward/FrankenFourth: Age of Worms, Episode 501

Cast
  • Humal (level 7 wrathful cambion wizard)
  • Corzale (level 7 dwarf war cleric)
  • Sumia (level 7 elf rogue/ranger)
  • Kuhnja'bi (level 7 human w/ devil-in-the-details fighter)
  • Cenric (level 7 human fighter)

Summary
After cleaning out Zyrxog's lair, Humal, Sumia, and Cenric followed Corzale back to the temple she was staying at. Corzale had warned the priests that they'd be coming, divulging that Humal was a necromancer, but was still trustworthy. When they arrived they ran into Kuhnja'bi, had traveled to Dovin in order to participate in the champion's games.

The party rested for the rest of the day (which wasn't nearly enough time for them to recover), and after Corzale made Humal promise not to use Zyrxog's notes to create any mimics, doppelgangers, or associated abominations they headed to the mage's guild in order to get their mundane and magical loot identified.

While Humal's membership granted him a discount, it still cost them hundreds of silver pieces to learn that most of the magical swag was in fact cursed: for starters, one of the books would likely damage the reader's mental faculties merely by glancing at its contents, the reliquary would cause whoever wore it to slowly wither away and die, and the sword would render whoever wielded it a frenzied madman.

Even the dagger that Sumia had obsessed over was cursed, that it was less overt than the rest. As best the diviner could tell, it would randomly afflict whoever carried it with varying degrees of misfortune. It was otherwise much more powerful than a normal dagger, and especially so against divine entities. This did little to deter Sumia; as it was she did not think that her luck could get much worse.

The voodoo doll that looked suspiciously like Corzale was impaled by a number of spine devil quills: Humal removed them, which caused the doll to bleed for a time. The psuedodragon statue was actually a petrified pseudodragon, which Humal paid to have restored. The bronze figurine of a more monstrous than usual griffon was a focus that could be used to summon such a creature, though the diviner warned that it would be hostile; Humal would need to find some means to press it into service.

Once they finished deciding what to keep, sell, and discard, Humal purchased a bag of holding and Sumia picked up a novice's tome on divination so that she could try and learn the basics. They then busied themselves translating Zyrxog's ledger. It detailed items that Zyrxog had sold to various clients, the most recent of which was Loris Raknian, who Kuhnja'bi knew to be a retired gladiator that hosted an annual contest in Dovin's arena.

He had purchased something called the Apostolic Scrolls, which Humal had seen referenced in one of Filge's books. It detailed, among other things, a process to create an ulgurstasta, an undead creature that could devour the living and vomit forth undead.

Design Notes
So, it's a good thing the party didn't try using most of the magic stuff they found in the previous session!

In terms of progressing through adventure content, this was a pretty slow session, but there was a lot of dialogue between characters (especially Corzale and Humal). It was refreshing to see two characters have a heated conversation that both players understood was merely "in character". The player of Corzale later mentioned that if things got too bad, he'd simply have Corzale leave and roll up another character, no biggie.

Maria's character picked up a masterwork weapon, because of course her slayer fighter needs more damage output (at something like 2d6+10 3d6+10 damage per hit he sooo doesn't). Currently, masterwork weapons and armor have one or two "slots", and each masterwork trait requires one or two slots (though even one-slot items are pretty rare, and most craftsmen can't make two-slot items). For example, +1 damage is one slot, and +1 to hit is two.

Speaking of crafting, the octopin flesh that Humal wisely kept allowed him to make a suit of (non-magical) leather armor for Sumia, that hardens when she remains still (because the octopins had a similar ability): mechanically, when she doesn't move on her turn her armor gets increased by 1. This is yet another example of treasure that isn't gold or gems or magic items.

Humal will also be able to use the beholder eyes to make potions, maybe a robe of eyes, or even go through the transmutation books and try inserting one into his forehead, giving him an eye ray ability.

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

A Sundered World: Player Fragments, the first supplement for A Sundered World, is finally out!

The Paladin is technically the sixth "core" class we've provided an alternative for. If you interested in an alternate class that isn't merely a half-assed reskin, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

(Very Late) RPGaDay: What Makes For a Good Character?

This isn't a useful question, because when it comes to characters, games can have varying levels of complexity, and can also focus on different things. So what makes a character "good" in one system may not be "good" in another. Plus, gaming groups will have their own preferences, which can also change over time.

For example, in Dungeon World you don't get much say in your character mechanically (you basically check a few boxes), you don't need a background to speak of, and the game is about dungeon crawling. I've played in Dungeon World games where players have both pitched really detailed backstories, or just filled in a name on a bond and answered a few questions before the dice started rolling.

Personally, a good Dungeon World character is one with a minimal background (only the necessary details, we can flesh things out later on assuming there is a later on) and primed to actually go on adventures, as opposed to, say, a fucking shopkeeper. I'm sure some will disagree, but since what a character is capable of and does is ultimately decided by their player, I think a better question is what makes for a good player.

Good players, for starters, don't show up for something like Dungeon World, then start bitching about how the game isn't about shit like helping to somehow uplift oppressed orcs. They don't hog the GM's attention and make the game all (or even mostly) about themselves. They don't claim that the only character they want to play in a 1st-level Dungeons & Dragons game is a half-dragon tiefling monk. They don't dismiss adventure hooks because the GM failed to sufficiently pander to them.

Good players play the game, and play well with the rest of the group. Instead of an obnoxious Lawful Stupid paladin threatening to kill any character that doesn't do what they want, or even frivolously consorts with things they don't like, good players find a reason to work with them anyway (of course other good players also don't deliberately attempt to goad said paladin into taking extreme action). Instead of a druid who refuses to leave her forest to go an adventure, a good player finds a reason (or just does so because that's the point of the fucking game).

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

A Sundered World: Player Fragments, the first supplement for A Sundered World, is finally out!

The Paladin is technically the sixth "core" class we've provided an alternative for. If you interested in an alternate class that isn't merely a half-assed reskin, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

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